The Comeback of the Century: Please Help Donate

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One nearly died, the other is fighting Lupus. Timothy Rhyme and Nay The Producer (First Dirt) are trying to make the Comeback Of The Century, literally.

Timothy Rhyme nearly lost his life on July 18, 2011.  He bled out internally and almost met the man upstairs.  Since that traumatic day, he has bounced back like James Blake.  Shortly after his recovery, he moved to LA to be closer to his daughter, got into CSUN, has made some significant strides in his music career, and kept his focus on helping people.

Nay The Producer was diagnosed with Lupus August 2012.  She spent the entire month  of October 2012 in the hospital. This flare up was so severe it caused fluid in her lungs, fluid around her heart and two blood transfusions. To go from a self reliant, hard working woman, to needing the assistance of a walker and cane to do menial things has put her in a hard spot.  Regardless, she keeps fighting and hasn’t let this unrelenting disease stop her from moving forward.

  Both have seen their lives be flipped upside down and completely altered forever.  This campaign is an attempt to raise funds to put together an amazing album but it subconsciously is touching the warrior spirit that we all have.  Some people would have let their circumstances get the best of them but Timothy Rhyme and Nay The Producer would not let defeat be a word that described them in this story. 

 This campaign is important for several reasons.  Not only will it allow Tim and Nay to tell their story.  But it will allow them to inspire others and show other people in similar predicaments that there is some hope and that they aren’t alone.  Music is one of the most powerful tools in lifting a persons spirit and this is one of the main objectives of this album.  In a world where most of the messages in music are about “cool” stuff and a glamorous life, Tim and Nay attempt to show that you can still make good music with a good message.  

If you have ever faced a challenging time in your life and just wished you had that little nudge to get you to the next step, this is your chance to be that to someone else.  This is your chance to be apart of the Comeback Of The Century!

What Your Generosity Will Fund

Through experience, Tim and Nay have figured out how to release a successful album.  They each have years and years of experience in this industry and have seen the formula first hand.  The main components are:

1.Mixing / Mastering

2.Album Cover Design 

3.Music Video

4.Distribution

5.Promotion

6.Merchandise

We budgeted every penny and used fair estimates of making sure we didn’t sacrifice quality.  If we are going to ask people to invest in us we want to make sure that their money is used to create the best product possible.

If for some reason we are unable to reach our goal.  Your investment will still be used for this album.  We might have to cut some corners and go the cheap route on some of the extra costs but either way it will go into the final album.

The Impact

Tim and Nay are really hoping to set a tone in the hip hop world.  They are consistently breaking down barriers when it comes to music arrangement and content within the hip hop community.  To be able to release this album in the manner they would like to would mean that the younger generations will have a new message to relate to.  In a world where negativity and self destructive tendencies reign supreme, this is a breath of fresh air to those that are looking for more honest depictions of the world they live in.

In the end, Tim and Nay hope to inspire future artists, students, and people in general to not be afraid to be themselves. They want to show that you can be yourself and still be successful. That you don’t always have to conform to what you see on TV to gain some notoriety.  

The impact will hopefully be felt for generations to come.  And when the next generation feels like they’re down and out they can be reminded that Tim and Nay made the Comeback Of The Century and so can they.

Other Ways You Can Help

We understand that times are hard and that you might not feel comfortable giving some strangers your hard earned money.  Rest assured that you even reading this has helped our cause and for that we are grateful. If you believe in this campaign and want to help in some other ways you can:

Get the word out to your friends and family and make some noise about our campaign.

Show someone that you might think would be inspired by this story.

Help us go viral.

Tell people in power.

Tell school officials about our empowering goals.

Go to www.firstdirt.com and purchase other music.

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http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/comeback-of-the-century

BANSKY

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Like a bird of paradise, 5 Pointz presides over a bleak stretch of Queens, next to a railyard and between roads that lead deeper into ever bleaker Long Island. But the unexceptional surroundings only make this “Mecca of Graffiti” all the more astounding: five stories of mustard-colored walls entirely covered with what is tactfully known as “aerosol art.

”It’s a modern-day Guernica in Long Island City, as the neighborhood is called, except this art was made not in response to war but to the terror and promise of modern urban life. A black man in a hoodie looms at eye level, rendered in Seurat’s pointillism. You may see a likeness of Biggie Smalls or Van Gogh, samurai and buxom women, all painted by different taggers, all somehow coexisting in this fruitful chaos.

This plein air exhibit of street art is soon coming to an end, though; the building is to be demolished to make way for condominiums. When news of the City Council’s approval of the move came last week, NY’s Gothamistlamented, “Somewhere an empty can of spray paint has rolled into a gutter, dented and rattling no more.

”And somewhere else, maybe right down the block, Banksy is at it. By pure coincidence, the British street artist has chosen October for a month-long residency in New York, putting up one of his graffito (or, occasionally, a performative piece like a truck full of stuffed farm animals driven around the city) somewhere in the city each day. The confluence of the two events — the imminent destruction of 5Pointz and Banksy’s residency — have made graffiti the talk of New York again.

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Graffiti is one of those intractable issues, like Middle Eastern politics: Everyone has an opinion, and everyone is right. The debate, which probably began when some Roman scrawled a filthy quip on a Coliseum wall,  still matters in the glass-and-steel New York of 2013, in which there are an estimated 6,000 “public-sector surveillance cameras” that may help in the identification and capture of illegal taggers (and perhaps a few terrorists).

Modern graffiti may have started as a response to urban blight, the emptying of cities in the postwar era and the absence of authority (all that empty wall space, all that free time). In its latest iteration, the form has been mastered by Banksy, a British artist whose real name is not known outside a small circle of associates. He has made a popular film, Exit Through the Gift Shop and his work has sold for hundreds of thousands of dollars, much to his chagrin, for Banksy prefers notoriety to fame. “Commercial success is a mark of failure for a graffiti artist,” he told the Village Voice.

And now he has come to New York for a project he calls “Better Out Than In.” Not everyone is pleased, least of all those who remember neighborhoods like the Lower East Side before the Olsen twins started hanging out at Sons of Essex, when unruly beards belonged not to hipsters but to Bowery bums. The Daily News  (where I was once an opinions editor ) welcomed Banksy to New  York by calling him “criminal” and  noting that the city spends some $2 million on graffiti clean-up each year.

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But it is hard to argue that Banksy’s stenciled works are purely a nuisance. His first work here,  in Manhattan’s Chinatown, depicted a newsboy standing on the shoulders of another as he grasped for a spray paint can inside a sign that reads “Graffiti Is a Crime.” Later, a delivery truck became a “mobile garden,” in the words of Banksy’s website. That website prominently displays a quote from Cezanne: “All pictures painted inside, in the studio, will never be as good as those done outside.” Paul may have been talking about lily ponds and haystacks but, well, point taken

.And while some grouse at graffiti’s recrudescence, many have embraced Banksy’s maverick intention to turn whatever wall he wishes into an exhibit. A Banksy beaver appeared in East New York, a tough stretch of Brooklyn. Hipsters flocked to see the work, and some enterprising locals began charging people to look at it, hiding the beaver behind a cardboard box. That was a brilliant comment on the nature of art, its commodification, its ability to reach the masses. If Banksy didn’t put these guys up to the task, then he’d at least have a good laugh at the expense of the Gagosians of this world. Equally clever was the stall he set up in Central Park “selling 100% authentic original signed Banksy canvases. For $60 each.” The stall was watched over by an old man in a baseball cap, and the first customer bargained him down 50%. Take that, Mary Boone.

But while Banksy is being celebrated, 5Pointz is headed for demolition. The building’s owner, Jerry Wolkoff, has long allowed the graffiti elder statesman Jonathan Cohen — a native of the South Bronx who goes by Meres — to curate a sort of open-air exhibit of graffiti on 5Pointz’s outer walls (the name refers to the city’s five boroughs, as well as to the historic lower Manhattan neighborhood popularized by Gangs of New York). But you can’t just show up with a spray can and a dream; Cohen screens all applicants, making 5Pointz a gorgeously unruly group show. It stands only a couple hundred yards from PS 1, the Museum of Modern Art branch whose generally avant-garde works looks tame in comparison.

5 Pointz is being razed to make way for two buildings containing 1000 units. Wolkoff assures the city that there will be outdoor space for “aerosol art,” and there is no reason not to take him at his word. But graffiti is supposed to be transgressive, its illegality intrinsic to its artistry. Even 5 Pointz was a sort of compromise with authority. To paint graffiti in the shadows of condominium towers will only be more so.

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As some struggling cities are being given over to the creative classes (Detroit welcomes hipster farmers and Baltimore dreams of being the next Portland) the artform that defined and was inspired by urban blight is becoming predictably tamed. Across the East River, at the Red Bull Gallery — yes, that Red Bull — in Chelsea, a show called “Write of Passage” opens this month. It is, according to organizer Mass Appeal, “a six-week educational program exploring the impact of American graffiti art on global culture.”  It will likely involve sitting in chairs and viewing slides, not vaulting over fences at Bronx rail yards to cover slumbering trains in tags.

The program is headed by Sacha Jenkins, a graffiti artist from Queens who recently told the New York Postthat Banksy’s tear across the city had not left him impressed: “I think with your blue-collar [graffiti artist], there’s not much respect for Banksy, because it’s not akin to what real graffiti is. And I’m sure there’s a bit of jealousy about the financial success he’s had.

”Are there still blue-collar taggers out there? Doubtlessly there are, scrawling whatever “real graffiti” may be. But their space is being threatened, while their work, if it is any good, is being commodified. While we may not all love graffiti, we know a marketing opportunity when we see one.

Mike Myers Officially In for ‘ Austin Powers 4

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Despite making boatloads of cash, the animated Shrek franchise has arguably been driven into the ground, with its third and fourth installments failing to meet the critical success of the first two. Outside of this franchise, star Mike Myers hasn’t been working too much and it’s no surprise after his last live-action feature The Love Guru was a total failure.

While many fans would love to see him reunite with Dana Carvey for another Wayne’s World, especially after they paired up to bring the sketch back more than once in recent years, we definitely are going to see Myers return to reprise his most recognizable character, the shagadelic super spy we know as Austin Powers.

HitFix just broke the news that comedian and voice actor extraordinaire, Mike Myers, has officially signed on to return as the title character in Austin Powers 4, a film which will likely take on a different title, spoofing another James Bond movie.

For years, we’ve heard murmurings of interest and movement in developing Austin Powers 4, but it’s largely been up to Myers to make it happen and he’s now decided the time is right and we can expect the movie to release in 2013.

Back in 2008, we reported that Myers had been working on the script alongside Mike McCullers who helped write the last two Austin Powers flicks, but nothing moved on that front for a two years, until director Jay Roach was asked about it at last year’s ShoWest. He explained that Myers was still pondering ideas for the next Austin Powers sequel and that he’d definitely be ready to jump back into the director’s chair (he directed the entire trilogy).

A while back there were also rumors of an Austin Powers spin-off movie that would focus on Dr. Evil but fortunately, that doesn’t seem to be in the cards anymore and we can expect him and other franchise familiars to return for fourth main franchise installment instead. Hopefully, Austin Powers 4 will bring back Michael Caine as Nigel Powers, Seth Green as Scott Evil and Verne Troyer as Mini Me, along with many of the characters Myers plays himself.

Who knows, perhaps Myers’ recent reappearances with Dana Carvey could lead to him being involved as well? Expect plenty of celebrity appearances regardless.

With the first three Austin Powers movies taking the names of International Man of Mystery, The Spy Who Shagged Me, Goldmember, what would you suggest forAustin Powers 4?

Miley Cyrus admits marijuana use: ‘Weed is the best drug on earth

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Miley Cryus has been revealing quite a bit of herself lately, including her thoughts on recreational drugs.

Miley Cyrus has taken it a step higher.In a new set of quotes released from Cyrus’ in-depth interview with the Oct. 10 issue of Rolling Stone magazine, the 20-year-old singer delves into her use of recreational drugs.

The former “Hannah Montana” starlet told the edgy mag that “weed is the best drug on earth,” and other substances such as cocaine and MDMA, also known as molly, don’t really hold a candle to marijuana

“One time I smoked a joint with peyote in it, and I saw a wolf howling at the moon,” Cyrus told Rolling Stone contributing editor Josh Eells.

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“Hollywood is a coke town, but weed is so much better. And molly, too. Those are happy drugs — social drugs. They make you want to be with friends. You’re out in the open. You’re not in a bathroom.”

“I really don’t like coke. It’s so gross and so dark. It’s like, what are you, from the ’90s? Ew,” she added.

Despite her slam on the ’90s, she did tell Rolling Stone that her controversial music video for “Wrecking Ball,” in which she strips completely nude, was inspired by an icon from the decade, Sinead O’Connor and her video for “Nothing Compares 2 U.”

“I wanted it to be tough but really pretty — that’s what Sinead did with her hair and everything.”

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The 20-year-old singer hopes her ‘Wrecking Ball’ video inspires artists 30 years from now. She hopes they say: ‘Yo, you remember that Miley Cyrus video? We gotta do something like that.’ 

O’Connor was not naked, but she was bald.

Cyrus admitted that she knew there would be backlash from her choice to ditch her clothes for the video version of the intense ballad.

“I think people are going to hate it. They’re going to see my ass and be like, ‘Oh my God, I can’t believe she did that,'” she said.

“And then when we get to the bridge, they’re gonna have a little tear and be like, ‘F–k you!’ I think it will be one of those iconic videos, too. I think it’s something that people are not gonna forget. Hopefully an artist 30 years from now will be like, ‘Yo, you remember that Miley Cyrus video? We gotta do something like that.'”

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Cyrus is well aware that she is a far cry from her days as a Disney darling, especially with her recent antics including her salacious MTV Video Music Award’s performance and her countless revealing photo shoots, however, she did say being a rebel can be emboldening.

“There’s something empowering about what I’m doing right now. Especially having short hair, don’t care. I think it’s empowering for girls,” she said.

“Because there’s not one thing that defines what beauty is.”

Cyrus goes on to address her love-hate relationship with the constant media attention surrounding her

“I said I was going to take a year off before I made this record. But it’s hard to take a break. It’s almost depressing when you’re not working. You’re so used to people calling your name, and that energy, and when you don’t have it anymore … That’s why I never complain about people wanting autographs or pictures. Because if there were a few days where no one asked, I’d probably be like, ‘What the fuck’s going on?? Do people not like me?’”

Cyrus continued on about the Catch-22 of fame

“I hate the paparazzi — but when they’re not sitting there waiting for you, you’re like ‘Who’s bigger news? Who are you trying to get a picture of?’”

Rock The Bells Cancel Festival Dates in Washington, D.C. & New York

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A source confirmed that both remaining dates would be cancelled due to poor ticket sales in the final two locations, and that the festival will take a $3 million loss over the shows and refund all tickets.

After having just announced the act lineupfor Rock The Bells in Washington, D.C. this weekend, it looks like festival organizers are cancelling the shows due to poor ticket sales.
According to the Washingon City Paper, representatives at RFK Stadium where Rock The Bells was scheduled at have confirmed that the shows have been cancelled for September 28 and September 29.

Ticketmaster has also removed ticket sale options from Rock The Bells in New York, which was scheduled for October 4 and October 5 at the Meadowlands Racetrack.As of press time, Rock The Bells have not released a statement regarding the cancelled shows. 

According to Ticketmaster (shown above), the streets and Twitterverse, fans in Washington, D.C. will not be “rocking the bells” with Kid Cudi, J Cole, A$AP Mob orWu-Tang Clan at RFK Stadium this weekend.  Sources say the annual concert was reportedly cancelled due to poor ticket sales.

,Although Chinyere Hubbard, the vice president for communications and marketing of Events DC, RFK’s operator hasconfirmed the cancellation, we’re still waiting on an official statement from Guerrilla Union (the promoters of Rock The Bells).

Also, speculation looms over the New York dates (Oct 4-5th) but we find it hard to believe that promoters can’t sell tickets in New York.
We send our regrets to anyone in the DMV area who had their mind set on seeing Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s hologram.  

BANKSY “BETTER OUT THAN IN”… COMING OCTOBER 2013?

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We were wondering when Banksy would make an appearence again, and it so we are served with an announcement of sorts of something happening in October 2013. In regards toBanksy. And we think its real because it comes from his/her very own website. And its called “Better Out Than In…”, which could mean all sorts of things, but most likely belly buttons. The piece was left, found, documented in Los Angeles… 
http://www.juxtapoz.com/banksy
http://www.banksy.co.uk/

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Tupac Biopic Headed To Production

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A long-gestating movie about the late rapper Tupac Shakur is closer to fruition, with Morgan Creek Productions and Emmet Furla Films announcing Thursday that they plan to co-finance and co-produce the film.Shakur’s mother, Afeni Shakur, will executive produce the movie, which is scheduled to begin production in Atlanta next year. Eddie Gonzales and Jeremy Haft, who wrote the 2011 direct-to-video crime drama “Street Kings II,” are currently working on a script about the influential rapper, who has sold more than 75 million albums.
Shakur, who was born in Harlem in 1971 and moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in 1988, was a vocal participant in the East Coast-West Coast hip-hop feud of the 1990s before he was killed in a shooting in Las Vegas in 1996.Shakur’s dramatic life has been the subject of multiple documentaries, including the 2003 film “Tupac: Resurrection” and 2002’s “Biggie and Tupac” about his rivalry with New York rapper Biggie Smalls.Previous efforts to get a narrative film made fell apart over negotiations for creative control between producers and Shakur’s mother. At one point, “Training Day” director Antoine Fuqua was attached.No director has yet been named for the rebooted project, and no actor has yet been cast in the title role.

Tupac Biopic Headed To Production.